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Primary Care

  • All year long, Western New Yorkers have one thing on our mind. I hear it time and time again as I sit down and talk to my patients on a daily basis. 

    “WHEN WILL SUMMER BE HERE?”

    The first moment the sun shows up and we feel the warmth, albeit only 50 degrees and sunny, we let our skin show. Now as the summer days are long, and the sun is bright, we stay outdoors as long as we can. We are so grateful to finally have warmth on our bodies that we forget about sun safety.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) provide wonderful reminders to keep our skin safe while still enjoying those warm and kind sun rays.

    They remind us first and foremost that ultraviolet (UV) rays are part of sunlight that is an invisible type of radiation. UVA and UVB cause aging and damage to the skin cells and are the most dangerous and cancer-causing types of sun rays. We also know that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The most common types of skin cancers include basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma.

    In order to protect our patients and ourselves, there are several things we can do to minimize our risk of skin damage. They include regular and routine use of broad-spectrum SPF 15 or greater sunscreen even when in the shade. Remember to reapply if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off. Wear clothing made from tightly woven cloth with SPF protection when possible, stay in the shade, wear a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses that preferably block UVA and UVB rays. 

    Lastly, if you do get too much sun, by accident of course, here are some simple tips to help your body recover: stay hydrated to prevent fluid loss, comfort skin burns with cool baths or clothes, take over-the-counter Tylenol or ibuprofen for fever or headaches, and remain out of the sun until you are feeling better.

    Katherine Sumner, PA-C is accepting new patients at 1091 Main Street, Suite 301, Buffalo. For more information on health safety or if you are worried about damage to your skin, call our office at 716.248.1420 to schedule an appointment.


  • Are you sick and tired of feeling sick and tired? Visiting your primary care physician might just help you change that. It’s good practice to call your doctor when you’re feeling under the weather, but it’s an even better practice to call your doctor before you’re sick.

    Preventative care is a critical part of your overall health and well being. Your primary care physician isn’t here just to help you when you’re sick, they’re here to keep you from getting sick by keeping a watchful eye over your health.


  • According to the CDC, diabetes affects more than 122 million Americans today, this includes both diabetes and prediabetes. It takes an incredible amount of work to keep your diabetes under control, and for the average person, managing diabetes is no small feat. Here are a few tips:

    Know Your Numbers

    After consulting with your doctor about your blood glucose targets, check them frequently to learn your trends. Your doctor will check your A1C every three months to determine your average blood glucose level. Also, check with your doctor on your blood pressure and cholesterol targets to keep those under control. Knowledge is power, and this will help you manage your diabetes. 

    Get Active

    It is essential to take care of yourself, both physically and mentally. COVID-19 may keep us socially distanced, but getting outside to walk just 10-15 minutes each day can significantly improve your health. Regular exercise has been shown to improve blood glucose levels and is an excellent tool for diabetes management. 

    Eat Right

    Healthy eating is a huge part of diabetes management. Food is a powerful tool, and it is essential to fuel your body with healthy foods to keep blood glucose levels low. Incorporating foods that are naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, is an excellent place to start!

    Take a Diabetes Education Class

    Classes are led and taught by Certified Diabetes Educators and are offered to the community in 4-week sessions. These classes can help you learn how your diet impacts your diabetes, how to plan healthy meals and snacks, interpret your blood glucose and A1C readings, find group support, and more.

    Virtual Diabetes Classes:

    December Session: 2, 9, 16, and 23,
    January/February Session: Jan 20 and 27, and Feb 3 and 10 
    Wednesday nights from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm. 
    Call our Williamsville office at 716.631.8400 to register or if you have any questions.

    Dunkirk - In-Person Diabetes Classes

    February Session: 2, 9, 16, 23 
    Tuesday nights from 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
    3898 Vineyard Drive, Suite 1 
    Dunkirk, NY 14048
    Call our Dunkirk office at 716.363-6960 to register or if you have any questions

    Or click here for more information: www.gppconline.com/specialties/clinical-support/nutrition-services

    Don't Stress

    Managing diabetes can seem overwhelming. If you feel stressed, anxious, or depressed, give your doctor a call. They can provide assistance and additional resources. You are not alone.

    See Your Doctor

    Get your flu shot and stay up-to-date on all other vaccinations. Make sure you have an annual foot and eye exam and check your feet daily to make sure there are no cuts, redness, swelling, corns, calluses, or sores. See your doctor regularly to eliminate any potential health risks that may arise with diabetes.

    Use this month to take some time to reflect on your diabetes management and continue to be vigilant in your care. Diabetes can feel overwhelming at times, but remember, it is a disease that can be controlled!

     

    Resources: 

    www.diabetes.org/diabetes

    www.cdc.gov/diabetes/index.html


  • Disney World closed. Broadway closed. The NBA, NHL, MLB, XFL, and NLL all suspended. Here in Buffalo, The St. Patrick’s Day Parade, a cultural must in our town, cancelled.

    COVID-19 is here, and it is here for the foreseeable future. At General Physician, PC, we are working every day to make sure not only our patients, providers and staff are informed and well-prepared, but also our community at large.


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